The Crafter’s (Improvised) Toolkit: 10 Tools in my Pro Tech That Get Used After Hours

It’s no secret that I’m a crafter. Whether it’s sewing, painting, or puppet-making, if it’s messy, creative, and a bit quirky—I’m into it. And time and again, I find myself using my Pro Tech Toolkit in the craft room as often as I do in the shop.

Wait, what? That’s right, I use my precision tools for crafting. Crafting is a form of repair in and of itself. Sewing decorative patches on to a pair of jeans, constructing a picture frame out of recycled wood, mending a torn teddy bear—it’s all breathing new life into something you already own. Lucky for me, iFixit’s tools team is as passionate about quality tools as I am about googly eyes and my glue gun. And when it comes to craft tools—quality counts. Here are a few of my favorite crafty uses for my Pro Tech tools:

  • Spudger (pointy end)
  • Sewing turning tool—Great for pushing corners out to get nice, flat seams.
  • Sculpting—I love using my spudgers in clay to carve detail into my work.
  • Poking through the little stuck cut-outs on my Cricut projects—A spudger works great for removing any little pieces that don’t quite get perfectly cut out.
  • Picking out fur that gets caught in seams—Running a spudger through the loops of caught fur and pulling it out of the seam saves a lot of stitch-ripping.
  • Spudger (flat end)
  • Bone scoring—Great for crisp folds on handmade cards or paper toys.
  • Scraping glue off my table—I told you I was into messy.
  • Sculpting—The flat end of the spudger is great for getting smooth surfaces and lines into clay.
  • Applying gold leaf—Or anything that needs to lay super flat, honestly.
  • Pushing out seams—When you sew two fabrics of different weight, sometimes the seam will try to roll. I love having a spudger handy to push the seam back into place.
  • Jimmy
  • Marking foam before cutting—This is a great way to score foam.
  • Cutting styrofoam—The Jimmy makes a smooth cut or indentation in styrofoam.
  • Halbert Spudger
  • Emergency crochet hook—You never know when you’re going to need to crochet.
  • Parting doll hair (or more often, monster fur)—The hook also works well to achieve more detailed hairstyles and shapes.
  • Untangling puppet strings—It’s amazing what happens when you turn your back from a puppet.
  • Metal Spudger
  • Removing the stuck-on bits of paper from my Cricut mat—The metal spudger is great for scraping off stuck-on bits on just about any work surface.
  • Sculpting—Like the other spudgers, the metal spudger is great for sculpting. The rounded shape makes great instant dragon scales or owl feathers in clay.
  • Holding a tight corner out while ironing—Inserting the spudger into the corner of a seam while you press it can help hold it in place, just don’t leave the iron it the spudger too long!
  • Emergency palette knife—Not kidding, when I am in the painting zone, there is no way I am hunting for a specialty tool if my Pro Tech is sitting nearby.
  • Tweezers
  • Picking up small strings and threads
  • Removing masking fluid
  • Setting tiny paper cut-out pieces
  • Reverse Tweezers
  • Seed bead wrangling—Seriously helpful when working one bead at a time.
  • Keeping track of a thread or string while I mess with one end of it.
  • Holding up small objects while I glue, glitter, or paint things on to it.
  • Angled Tweezers
  • These suckers are crazy sharp. If you need to poke a tiny hole, these tweezers are perfect for the job.
  • Setting sequins or rhinestones into tiny dots of glue
  • Pulling out threads
  • Guiding small sewing projects through your sewing machine
  • Picks
  • Spreading glue
  • Spacers—Great for creating a narrow gap between pieces.
  • Tracing rounded angles—Sure, I have an oval template, but picks work great too!
  • Creasing folds without leaving marks—Picks are great for creasing crepe paper and other delicate materials without leaving much of a mark behind.
  • Preventing a needle from going through too many layers—Tuck a pick in between a few layers of fabric while hand-sewing to make sure you don’t sew a pocket shut.
  • Bit Kit
  • Adjusting the tension on my bobbin case
  • Opening paint cans
  • Stamping tiny bit shapes onto paper or fabric
  • Fixing the loose towel rack—Helpful when you’re constantly washing glitter glue off your hands from crafting so much.